Enemy UAV Defense is under consideration

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles should be shot down from the air rather than the ground because if they are flown tele-robotically the operator who is looking down and forward will not know where the anti-aircraft device is. If the enemy uses Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to draw fire, which is a smart move for them, then once fired upon the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle whether it is shot down or not has now located our weaponry and troops. Likewise if we have a loitering Unmanned Aerial Vehicle above the enemy once they shoot it, we see the hostile fire and either "hell fire missile it" or take coordinates of the insurgents locations and wire it to the most appropriate component of the net-centric blue force.

If an enemy Unmanned Aerial Vehicle locates our troops it is only a matter of time before they are eliminated, so it is essential to shoot down all enemy robotic or autonomous, AI or not, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Shooting down a Unmanned Aerial Vehicle with small arms fire is dangerous and nearly impossible. It is for that reason that they must be shot down from the air. It is easier to shoot one down from the air, but not an easy over all task. The best way to shoot them down would be aerial laser from a floating reflector above the battles space or just above line of sight. The Unmanned Aerial Vehicle will not know where it came from, it will fry the electronics immediately and do so at the speed of light. By using an aerial blimp we have additional coordinates in the 3D battlespace. Shooting down swarms of incoming Unmanned Aerial Vehicles should deploy similar tactics for best results (eliminating all Unmanned Aerial Vehicles or MAVs in the swarm).

Nearly every country in the world has Unmanned Aerial Vehicle programs in development, this means our allies and our enemies. We have even seen technology leak from friendly countries to questionable ones and then end up in the hands of International Terrorists. Just recently Hezbolla has bagged about flying a Unmanned Aerial Vehicle into Northern Israel. No one understands what the purpose in doing this is. But it stands to reason that if they are strapping bombs on down syndrome kids and sending them into Israel to get on buses and blow themselves and everyone else up, that you cannot put anything passed them? Is Hezbolla planning single mission Unmanned Aerial Vehicle model airplane kamikaze attacks? It appears so. As these International Terrorists get more sophisticated with their weaponry, we will have to find ways to defeat these Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and do so in a way, which does not give away our troops positions. Think about it.

"Lance Winslow" - If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs

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