Write An Effective Job Proposal

I am simply amazed at the problems some of my colleagues are experiencing regarding writing job proposals for customers. So often I hear that there has been some sort of disagreement between client and service provider, something that can and should be avoided before a project is started. Here are four tips to help you write an effective job proposal letter.

Assume Nothing My junior high English teacher gave his students the real meaning of assume: if you assume something it makes an ass out of you and me: ass-u-me. Leave nothing to chance. When you speak with a client do not assume they understand much of what you have to offer. For instance, I sell website packages. I have learned to spell out everything that I will offer to my customers for a very specific price. If there are any "gray areas" I protect myself by telling customers that certain other expenses will be billed separately. Do not box yourself into a corner and do not pull surprises on your customers as they may think you are trying to cheat them. Keep the lines of communication wide open.

Get It In Writing Save all of your email correspondence with clients including emails you send and emails you receive. Sometimes what is not said verbally is articulated in writing. For example, I write much better than I speak, therefore I am more likely to put my ideas forth via "ink" or "type" than I am to verbalize them. In either case follow up your contact by placing everything in writing. You will need that paper trail in case something goes wrong e.g., a refusal to pay for services rendered.

Make Changes, If Necessary Sometimes projects change as the work goes forward. If it is a minor change, such as cropping a few extra photographs, you can probably "eat" the additional labor. However, if your project increases in size, let's say your clients now want a 12 page website instead of an 8 page site, they need to know that you need to be compensated for the extra work. Specify in your proposal letter that any changes to the project will incur additional charges; remind them of this "clause" should any major change be proposed. Your customer may decide not to go with the larger project after counting the additional costs.

Write a Contract I have done fairly well without contracts. Many of my customers know me quite well, therefore the proposal letter serves as a contract of sorts. I also require my customers to pay me 50% as an advancement; if they walk away from the contract upon completion of my work their website does not get uploaded to the internet. At the very least I have partial compensation for my hard work. Your experience or risk factors may be much different than mine; certainly use contracts if your customers are not well known to you or you do not have a previous business relationship.

In summation, every satisfied customer is a potential referral for new business. Keep those communication lines open and understood and you will garner additional projects because of your sound business practices.

(c)2005; Matthew C Keegan, LLC

Matt Keegan is The Article Writer who writes on a variety of topics including aviation, business, customer service, product review, sales, and more. Visit http://www.thearticlewriter.com for additional samples of his work.

In The News:


Choosing a Truck Wash Location in Nevada, Case Study

There are several well-known truck washes in the Great State... Read More

SBAs 8(a) Program Can Help Some Companies Compete

Q: A friend told me that as a woman of... Read More

So What? How to Elicit Benefits from Features

"So what?" is a lovely question.It can lead to a... Read More

Professional Car Care Businesses You Can Start

If you are in the professional car care business you... Read More

Direct Mail - For Small Businesses

We hear a lot of talk about junk mail nowadays.... Read More

Image is Everything - Secrets to Cleaning Car Fleets

A recent survey indicated that clean Taxi Cabs Fleets have... Read More

Small Business Secrets: Self-Confidence Can Be Arranged

At first blush this idea might be difficult to wrap... Read More

Small Does Not Mean Invisible!

Running a business on the net these days can be... Read More

Home Based Franchise Case Study

Here is an interesting case study of a company, which... Read More

Buy a Flower Shop: Serious Considerations

You've always liked flowers and you think the idea of... Read More

Tips For Successful Home Show Businesses

Opportunities for home show businesses have never been more abundant.... Read More

Why is My Restaurant Not Full Every Monday Night?

In a quest for customers and to keep those customers,... Read More

Does Your Company Have a Business Image Manual

Every business regardless of size needs a "Business Image Manual"... Read More

FFP vs. CPFF Contracts

SBIR Corner: FFP vs. CPFF contracts:In the SBIR/STTR world, the... Read More

Most Franchises Are Small Home Businesses

Many of our nations 400,000 franchisees run their businesses out... Read More

Freelance Tips: How to Cope with Spring Fever When Theres Work to Be Done

We all know how glorious those first warm days of... Read More

Detailing Business Options

So you want to get into the auto detailing business... Read More

North County San Diego Small Business

North County San Diego has had some significant growth, and... Read More

Creative Marketing Tips: Simple Things You Can Use In Your Business To Attract More Clients

The single most important activity you can do in your... Read More

11 Things Small Business Owners Can Learn From The Miracle On Ice

1. Know Where You're Going ? Coach Herb Brooks had... Read More

Tips on Setting Up Your Small Business Bank Account

One of the first things you will need to set... Read More

Debt Collection Techniques

Here are some sound debt collection techniques that can be... Read More

Dealing With a Crooked on the Take Government Worker

Many government department heads are on the take. Oh they'll... Read More

You Are Invited

Business card size works well for invitations to special events.What... Read More

Three Ways to Add Leverage to Your Small Business

Remember those drawings from science class of how a lever... Read More