Wholistics

I have yet to see a scientist talk about the impact of time viewing in any article. It will ensure the continuing exponential growth in knowledge. I think it is quite possible that this has been part of what has unleashed Pandora's Box already and it is a far better explanation for many things that the UFOlogists are talking about. There have been a number of recent Popes who say that aliens will come to teach us in this century and there is a scientist/priest who supposedly developed a chronovisor. The combination of already developing technology in Holography, nanotechnology, and quantum teleporting may make it possible to travel to various potential futures with intelligent machines that include the human brain contents which were dumped onto a computer by Stanford in 1999. The lack of dialogue in the media about these things is very troubling to me as people continue to accept our leaders know what they are doing.

I am even more troubled by the difficulty really good teachers have in getting meaningful curriculums approved. The ex-NHL goalie and Ralph Nader lawyer by the name of Ken Dryden wrote a book called In School. The back flap of it has this tidbit for your consideration: "Ken Dryden tackles what he sees as the education debate's retreat to a safe, unthinking - and ultimately - black and white ground of issues and policies at the expense of people. Ultimately he discovers that good teachers teach people and not just subjects." (8) Ken was just elected to Parliament from a Toronto area riding and I expect he will achieve very little change, but who knows?

Wholistics:

The prevailing medical opinion of 'experts' in the specialized field of heart ailments and the like, was that heart disease was incurable and that heart muscle could not regenerate. Not so long ago this nearly militant and totally negative or 'head in the sand' aspect of what some call 'The Toilet Philosophy' was rampant in the mechanized and unsoulful vestibules of veracity known as medicine. This model is still predominant but on the retreat because of great people like Patch Adams and the wholistic health movement. As the great sage Voltaire said: 'Man argues. Nature acts!'

Linus Pauling won a Nobel Prize for scientifically showing the benefits of vitamin therapy but it took over twenty five years for other researchers to prove much of his work. Dr Campbell at the University of Alabama finally drove the point home in 2001 when he gave detailed support, in that the immune system of mice produces a three times more effective partner in the fight against illness with the use of Vitamin C. Pauling knew stress was an important factor in how our bodies function. The thalami are far more important than medical science has historically given them credit for, since the allopathic gurus or 'drug-pushers' took over the healing arts.

Stress, a Heart Poison

High blood pressure, high cholesterol and lipid levels, poor glucose metabolism--all of these risk factors for heart disease can be identified and measured by scientifically accepted methods. {How do you measure the conscious input of the soul through the Thalami and the immune or endocrine system? This is the circulatory system of the soul according to many long effective remedies of the homeopathic or 'occult' genre we have detailed throughout these books. Clearly acupuncture works and it has for thousands of years but only now are researches of a truly open-minded nature taking place.} For that reason, mainstream medicine has concentrated on assessing and treating these medical problems during much of the twentieth century, for the most part leaving aside another integral part of the cardiovascular picture: the effect of stress on the heart, blood and blood vessels. {This book is recommended reading by the editors of Prevention Magazine Health Books, and he is a good doctor.}

The difficulty many physicians have in assessing stress is three-fold: First, except for extreme situations, like the death of a loved one or the imminent threat of physical harm, a clear definition of stress is not available {My 'twin' was a lecturer in the convention auditoriums of up to 15,000 people during the Stress Management 'fad' of the 70s and early 80s. She would throw dishes or slam doors when unable to handle her stresses. Of course she didn't tell others these things when advising them what to do.}. Everything that occurs in your life or exists in the atmosphere is technically a stressor because it affects you in some way. If it is very hot out, for instance, your body will adjust to the increased temperature by cooling the skin with perspiration. In this instance, heat is a stressor because it spurs the body to action. If you receive an unexpected bonus from your boss, the excitement {When I decreed that I would win an RX-7 in Mazda's nationwide salesman contest in 1988 for a month to all my fellow salespeople at Tom Wood's dealership in Indianapolis - I won! The manager played head games with me for two hours on the day of the announcement. This was the closest I ever came to a heart attack, I think!} the event stimulates may make your heart beat faster, your muscles tense up, your palms sweat. Despite its positive impact, then, the news of your bonus is a stressor because it forces a physiological reaction--one that will be described in more depth below--to occur.

A second problem in relating stress to disease involves how variable our reactions to stress tend to be. Clearly, not everyone responds to stress in the same way. Some people become outwardly aggravated over the slightest mishap while others never blink an eye even when disaster occurs. It should be noted, however, that the outwardly calm person may actually be seething inside, perhaps negatively affecting his or her physiology even more than the person who expresses anger and frustration in a more open way. {The Carnegie Public Speaking Course is an excellent way of learning to adapt to personal stress responses for many people.}

Third, and even more significantly, stressors vary from person to person. For some, a day spent lying on a beach is completely relaxing, while for others such forced recreation is sheer (often blood-pressure raising) torture. It is how you as an individual perceive an event that determines how your body reacts to it.

Despite the difficulties in defining and measuring stress, it has become increasingly clear to even the most hard-nosed mainstream physicians that a connection exists between the mind the emotions, and health. In the study of heart disease, in particular, evidence has begun to mount that excess stress increases the amount of cholesterol in the blood, thus contributing to the development of atherosclerosis. Stress may also increase the heart rate and raise blood pressure. In many individuals, including Melinda, stress results in decreased circulation to the heart muscle itself, often causing the pain known as angina.

Fortunately, it is possible to learn to control both the way you perceive stress and how your body copes with it, at least to a certain extent. Before we discuss relaxation methods with you, however, it is important that you gain an understanding of how stress affects your cardiovascular system and how you, as an individual, may be affected by stress.

The Physiology of Stress

If you've ever doubted that there is a connection between your emotions and your internal physiology {Or ESP.}, just think about the first time you fell in love. When you looked across the room and saw the object of your affection, didn't your heart beat faster? Didn't your palms sweat? Didn't you feel as if you might faint because the blood had rushed from your head to your feet as you tried to make your way to the one you loved?

In addition to infatuation, what you were feeling was fear and anticipation--of rejection, of commitment, of the unknown, perhaps even of success--and your body sensed your emotions. In a completely instinctive and interdependent way {ESP}, your brain, your hormones, and your nervous system worked to prepare you to face what you perceived as a threat to your emotional, if not physical, safety. Whether you are conscious of it or not, your body has a remarkable gift for self-preservation. When its internal balance is threatened in any way, it mobilizes immediately, preparing you either to battle the impending danger or to flee from it. We're perhaps more used to thinking of this response, known as the 'fight-or-flight response', as occurring during times of physical danger: Out of nowhere, it seems, a bus bears down on you while you're crossing the street. Your heart starts to pound and the muscles in your legs and arms tense up. Before you know it, you're safely across the street, running faster and harder than you'd thought possible.

The sight of your new love and the sight of the bus set off the same chain of reactions in your body. As soon as a threat to your internal harmony is perceived--positive or negative--your body goes into action. In fact, it is no longer possible to discuss a separation between what we think and feel and our physical selves; they are one and the same. You see a bus coming toward you and your heart starts to pound. Thinking back, you recall you felt afraid, and one of the physical manifestations of that fear was your heart beating faster and stronger. You've been taught by mainstream medicine to think that your brain 'told' your heart to beat faster and your muscles to tense up. However, recent research is showing that your mind exists not only in your brain, but in cells and tissues throughout your body. {And the chakras are critical centers of coordination.}

In particular, two interrelated systems, the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system, become more active during times of stress. These two systems are so directly related to what is occurring to us emotionally and intellectually that they can be considered the physical representatives of emotions within the body.

The autonomic nervous system controls bodily functions like the heartbeat, intestinal movements, salivation, and other activities of the internal organs. It is divided into two parts that work to balance these activities: The sympathetic nervous system speeds up heart rate, narrows blood vessels, and raises blood pressure during times of physical or emotional stress, while the parasympathetic nervous system works to slow these processes down when the body perceives that the stress has passed.

Indeed, the two parts of the autonomic system represent a perfect example of the balance we know of as health. In Chinese medicine, the sympathetic nervous system is the 'yang' {This is a partial analogy that works for his illustration.} and the parasympathetic system is the 'yin' of the body and its responses. Bringing your body into harmony during and after stressful periods, by triggering your parasympathetic nervous system into action, is as important to your health as is reacting immediately, through the sympathetic nervous system, to the perceived threats known as stressors.

Directly related to nervous system activity are hormones secreted by the glands of-the endocrine system. The glands release stress hormones into the bloodstream that, in turn, produce various reactions in the organs and tissues of the body. These hormones are nor epinephrine and epinephrine (also called adrenaline). These two hormones are known as catecholamines. Secreted by the adrenal medulla (the internal part of the adrenal gland) and the sympathetic nerve endings themselves, catecholamines stimulate the sympathetic nervous system to raise blood pressure, continue to increase the heart rate, increase the metabolic rate, and make you breathe faster to provide more oxygen to your muscles. They also increase platelet stickiness, increase 'the possibility of dangerous arrhythmias and strokes, and cause spasm of coronary arteries. (9)

It has been easy for us to visualize certain extremely complex integrations of bodies and component organ to molecular level real aspects by gross and overly general designations and labels. When we actually believe the labels are what we simplify them to be; and then communicate about them as if their function is either exclusive or unaffected by and from the soul and other aspects such as yin and yang or its real 'chhi' that surrounds and is part of ALL there is - we end up missing the merit and value of what happens. This author is extremely enlightened in comparison to his counterparts and fairly reflects the wholistic possibilities.

Author of over 60 books available at Lulu.com, World-Mysteries.com and other places where Diverse Druids is sold. Activist for the truth in our soul that has been aborted or which has been occulted by elites to allow them to bamboozle us and make us live in fear rather than LOVE.

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