New Energy Bill: Reducing Our Dependence on Foreign Oil

The U. S. economy is feeling the brunt of skyrocketing oil prices as the nation's dependence on foreign oil continues to grow. We need a responsible energy plan to reduce our reliance on foreign oil. President Bush and Senator Kerry appear to be skirting the real issues involved. Growing... Read More

America and its Collision Course

Energy ESP #7 - America and its Collision CourseCrude oil explodes through $46.50 as the problems are growing -It's bigger than Iraq, bigger than Bin Laden and even bigger thanthe next election. America has entered into an exhaustive racefor survival - And nobody is talking about it.Talking about what you... Read More

Positive Effects of Carbon Dioxide for Plant Growth

Many articles have been written about the negative effects of carbon dioxide. Sick Building Syndrome, loss of concentration due to high levels of carbon dioxide, asphyxiation in breweries or wine cellars, all these things spring to mind when we hear the magic phrase carbon dioxide. Yet, perhaps today when Venus... Read More

Marine News - Summer 2004 - Our Ocean Environment

Our oceans are home to many marine mammals, fish, turtles, corals and others. The delicate balance between man and the ocean is constantly being challenged by the demands of our society. Most of our planet is covered by water, a necessary ingredient of human life. The state of our oceans... Read More

How Body Piercing Works -- The Ins and Outs of this Cutting Edge Process

Body piercing (defined as any piercing beyond the standard earlobe piercing) has become such a popular form of body modification that between five and ten percent of the population of the United States has indulged in at least one form of it at some time in their lives. In most... Read More

The Joy of Recycling

I have always been an advocate of recycling. Even though I am not always convinced of its financial viability, I am thoroughly convinced of its value as a means of increasing public awareness of the cost of our consumerism. In the 20+ years I have been in the organizing profession,... Read More

Energy and America

America is entering into a time of Energy crisis. It could easily be the greatest crisis that human-kind is to face. America can not continue to lead the world econimcally and drain it dry at the same time. The National Collegiate Clean Energy Initiative is working to unite American students... Read More

Diamond Flashes

Beyond magnificence and splendor, the world of diamonds evolves on stirred grounds. When the stake is so important, interests collide. But technology develops following its onward course. Here are some interesting off-stage events in the diamond industry and innovations in technology.De Beers sued by head of the Diamond BourseDerek Parsons,... Read More

The Valuable Individual

How can we, as individuals, participate in waste management? Because some of us are so overwhelmed with Earth's problems, we feel that our contributions have no real consequence in the end. For others, social barriers can be an issue. A lady we once knew confessed that she did not want... Read More

Trash Talk Your Way to a Better World

North Americans account for less than 10% of the world's population, yet we produce 50% of the world's garbage and consume more than 33% of it's resources. If everyone consumed like the average North American, we would require three Earths!Authors Dave and Lillian Brummet offer an upbeat, proactive look at... Read More

In The News:

Martian methane—spotted in 2004—has mysteriously vanished  Science MagazineMars's methane has gone missing. Scientists first detected traces of the gas—a critical indicator of life on Earth—in the planet's atmosphere decades ago.
Mars lander takes a selfie  Science MagazineAfter painstakingly swiveling the camera mounted on its robotic arm for a week, NASA's InSight spacecraft, which landed last month on Mars, has completed its ...
Insects are disappearing from science textbooks—and that should bug you  Popular ScienceInsect-related *content* fell 75 percent in textbooks published after 2000 as compared to those published before 1965.
Solving the fake news problem in science Solving the fake news problem in science  STATThe number of times a scientific paper is cited is a poor proxy of quality, and can lead to fake news. We need a better way to evaluate research quality.
NASA's Juno mission halfway to Jupiter science  Science DailyOn Dec. 21, NASA's Juno spacecraft will be 3140 miles (5053 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops and hurtling by at a healthy clip of 128802 mph (207287 ...
The End of DACA Would Be a Blow to Science  Scientific AmericanOn November 5, the eve of midterm elections, the Department of Justice (DOJ) filed a motion to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), bypassing ...
Scientists identify vast underground ecosystem containing billions of micro-organisms  The GuardianGlobal team of scientists find ecosystem below earth that is twice the size of world's oceans.
Science photos of the year  Science MagazineOur Science Visuals team reviewed the most striking photographs we published this year. Here are the ones that moved us the most: Previous. Iguazu Falls.
Virgin Galactic launches SpaceShipTwo to the edge of space  The GuardianSpacecraft launched on Thursday in test mission that would be first commercial US flight beyond the atmosphere since 2011. Reuters. Thu 13 Dec 2018 10.31 ...
Cold War propaganda spread the myth that science isn’t political  The VergeScience historian Audra Wolfe's new book, Freedom's Laboratory, explores the science of the Cold War beyond its more tangible role in developing weapons.
This 8000-year-old 'gum' holds surprises about ancient toolmakers  Science MagazineGum won't really sit in your stomach for years, but it can preserve human DNA for millennia. Researchers have uncovered genetic material encased within ...
Sci-Tech 100 2019: 22 high-flying scientists making the world a better place in 2019  Siliconrepublic.comSci-Tech 100: In a world changing rapidly before our eyes, here are 22 scientists aiming to advance our understanding of the world and beyond in 2019.
Mission Ignition proposing science centre for Christchurch police station site  Bournemouth EchoPLANS to create a new science centre in Christchurch have been reignited as plans for a major new development move forward.
Firing up Weird Science at the Whitney  The New York TimesKevin Beasley confronts King Cotton's legacy in his solo museum show.
The science is conclusive: That fetus is a baby  Des Moines RegisterThe Register's Rekha Basu argues in a recent column that calling a fetus a "baby" is somehow a construct of religion and rhetoric, rather than "established ...
Biomax Informatics launches the NeuroXM™ Brain Science Suite  Associated PressPLANEGG, Germany--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Dec 13, 2018--Biomax Informatics AG announced the launch of its latest product, the NeuroXM™ Brain Science Suite ...
Just thinking you have poor endurance genes changes your body  Science MagazineIf you want to win a race or stick to a difficult diet, coaches of all kinds will tell you it's all about “mind over matter.” But that advice rarely crosses over into the ...
Viking cat skeletons reveal a surprising growth in the size of felines over time  Science MagazineMany animals shrink when they become domesticated—the average dog is about 25% smaller than its wild cousin the gray wolf, for example—but a curious ...
'Scary' warming at poles is worrying scientists  Fox NewsWASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are seeing surprising melting in Earth's polar regions at times they don't expect, like winter, and in places they don't expect, like ...
Science in Play arrives at McLean County Public Library  messenger-inquirerBy Seth Dukes. McLean County News. [email protected] The Kentucky Science Center's Science in Play 2Go (SIP2G0) is coming to the McLean ...
Scientists crack the CRISPR code for precise human genome editing  EurekAlertScientists at the Francis Crick Institute have discovered a set of surprisingly simple rules that determine the precision of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in human ...
2 technicians killed at Antarctica science station  The Associated PressNEW YORK (AP) — The National Science Foundation says two technicians working on a fire-suppression system at an Antarctica scientific station were found ...
Update: NIH says cancer study also hit by fetal tissue ban  Science MagazineUpdate, 13 December: A third laboratory at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is also affected by the agency's temporary ban on acquiring new human fetal ...
EPA science adviser allowed industry group to edit journal article  Science MagazineRisk analyst Tony Cox invited oil industry funder to review his work.
New study says scientists are leaving academic work at unprecedented rates  Inside Higher EdThe “half-life” of academic scientists has shortened dramatically over time, says a new paper calling attention to the “rise of the temporary workforce.” Following ...
Artificial intelligence helps predict volcanic eruptions  Science MagazineSatellites are providing torrents of data about the world's active volcanoes, but researchers have struggled to turn them into a global prediction of volcanic risks.
At arm's length  Science MagazineA few years ago, scientists funded by the Wellcome Trust, one of the world's wealthiest private philanthropies, published sobering findings about the deadly ...
6 Things You Never Realized Can Cure Inflammation, According To Science  BustleSkin issues, digestive troubles, joint pain — these are all symptoms of chronic inflammation. Everything from your genetics to your lifestyle habits can cause ...
‘Creative’ AlphaZero leads way for chess computers and, maybe, science  The GuardianThe former chess world champion Garry Kasparov said he likes what he sees of the AlphaZero computer that could be used to find cures for diseases.
South Korean scientists protest treatment of university president accused of misusing funds  Nature.comThe science ministry alleges that KAIST leader Shin Sung-Chul made illegal payments to a California lab, but many scientists see a political purge.
The Science of Growing a Perfect Christmas Tree  WIREDIs your tree robust to cold? Do its needles cling to their branches? Christmas tree scientists ask these questions so we don't have to.
How deaf researchers are reinventing science communication  The VergeScience is a language unto itself, and scientists rely on precise, standard terminology for common ground in their work. But for deaf researchers and students, ...
Holding science accountable for upholding white supremacy  CU Columbia SpectatorOn Sunday, Dec. 9, Julian von Abele, CC '21, a sophomore in the physics department, made a series of claims perpetuating white male supremacy, especially in ...
A general reinforcement learning algorithm that masters chess, shogi, and Go through self-play  Science MagazineComputers can beat humans at increasingly complex games, including chess and Go. However, these programs are typically constructed for a particular game, ...
These are our favorite science books of 2018  Science NewsFrom tales about whales to enthralling scientific histories and the memoir of a frustrated astrophysicist, 2018 was a banner year for science books. Here are ...
Scientists identify new minerals for carbon capture  Science DailyResearch confirms new minerals are capturing and storing carbon. The minerals, members of the hydrotalcite group, are the first outside of the carbonate family ...
A mechanistic classification of clinical phenotypes in neuroblastoma  Science MagazineNeuroblastomas—the most common tumor type in infants—develop from fetal nerve cells, and their clinical course is highly variable. Some neuroblastomas are ...
The Math of Spot It! | Science  Smithsonian.comIf you are a parent of children under the age of about 10, the chances are very good that you are acquainted with a game called “Spot It!” Spot It!, in its distinctive ...
Temperature-dependent hypoxia explains biogeography and severity of end-Permian marine mass extinction  Science MagazineThough our current extinction crisis is substantial, it pales in comparison to the largest extinction in Earth's history, which occurred at the end of the Permian ...
The 10 biggest science stories of 2018  New Zealand HeraldFrom the meth house myth to gene-edited babies, it was a big year for science news.
Bose-Einstein condensates cannot currently detect gravitational waves  Science DailyThe gravitational waves created in the depths of space indeed reach Earth. Their effects, however, are so small that they could only be observed so far using ...
Semiconducting polymer blends that exhibit stable charge transport at high temperatures  Science MagazineCharge carriers move through semiconductor polymers by hopping transport. In principle, these polymers should be more conductive at higher temperatures.
For China, a CRISPR first goes too far  Science MagazineDoes a Chinese scientist's claim that he used CRISPR to create two baby girls resistant to HIV show that research ethics here are more permissive than ...
Open-source discovery of chemical leads for next-generation chemoprotective antimalarials  Science MagazineMalaria parasites are evolutionarily prepared to resist drug attack. Resistance is emerging to even the latest frontline combination therapies, which target the ...
Prolonged milk provisioning in a jumping spider  Science MagazineMammals produce milk to feed their offspring, and maternal care often continues well after the young can forage for themselves. Though other cases of milk-like ...
Flawed analyses of U.S. auto fuel economy standards  Science MagazineCorporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions standards for passenger vehicles and light trucks have long been a ...
After last week's shock, scientists scramble to prevent more gene-edited babies  Science MagazineFew seemed more surprised by the tide of outrage unleashed by the claim that the first gene-edited babies had been created with the revolutionary lab tool ...
Uncertainty boosts Brexit jitters for U.K. scientists  Science MagazineU.K. scientists dreading the country's impending departure from the European Union, known as Brexit, now face possible outcomes ranging from undesirable to ...
Buying time  Science MagazineIn a fast-changing environment, evolution can be too slow. "Plasticity" can give it a chance to catch up. Open in new tab. When conditions are right, spadefoot ...
Climate change is 'shrinking winter'  BBC NewsSnowy mountain winters are being "squeezed" by climate change, according to scientists in California. Researchers who studied the winter snowfall in the ...
Google's DeepMind aces protein folding  Science MagazineTurns out mastering chess and Go was just for starters. On 2 December, the Google-owned artificial intelligence firm DeepMind took top honors in the 13th ...
Report that NIH will cancel fetal tissue research contract fuels controversy  Science Magazine*Update, 6 December, 11:45 a.m.: Responding to a Freedom of Information Act request from ScienceInsider, NIH has released its 3 December letter to UCSF ...
Why 536 was 'the worst year to be alive'  Science MagazineAsk medieval historian Michael McCormick what year was the worst to be alive, and he's got an answer: "536." Not 1349, when the Black Death wiped out half of ...
The Best Science Books Of 2018  Science FridayHere at Science Friday, our jobs involve reading a lot of science books every year. We have piles and piles of them at the office. Hundreds of titles about biology ...
The scientists who feed us  Nature.comScientists in the food industry find diverse roles from mediating public-health scares to perfecting meatless burgers.
10 benefits of being attractive, according to science  INSIDERThere may actually be perks to being seen as beautiful. Here are a few benefits to being conventionally good-looking, according to science.
U.S. Stands with Russia and Saudi Arabia against Climate Science  Scientific AmericanKATOWICE, Poland—The United States worked with Russia and Saudi Arabia on Saturday night to sideline climate science in U.N. negotiations, angering ...
China sets out for the far side of the moon  Science MagazineSHANGHAI, CHINA—China's ambitious program of lunar exploration is about to attempt a spacefaring first: On 8 December it will launch a probe intended to ...
Royal jelly research could propel cure for Alzheimer’s, claim scientists  The GuardianIt is the mysterious substance that turns worker honeybees into queens and fills the shelves of health food shops which tout its unverified powers to fend off ...
The Parker Solar Probe takes its first up-close look at the sun  Science NewsNASA's Parker Solar Probe survived its first encounter with the sun and is sending data back to Earth.
First lab-grown steak unveiled as scientists say it will be available to buy within two years  Telegraph.co.ukThe first lab-grown steak will be available to buy in two years after scientists finally produced meat with the correct appearance, shape and texture of a real slice ...
CRISPR bombshell: Chinese researcher claims to have created gene-edited twins  Science MagazineHONG KONG, CHINA—On the eve of an international summit here on genome editing, a Chinese researcher has shocked many by claiming to have altered the ...
Why Did Humans Lose Their Fur? | Science  SmithsonianMillions of modern humans ask themselves the same question every morning while looking in the mirror: Why am I so hairy? As a society, we spend millions of ...
Spider moms spotted nursing their offspring with milk  Science MagazineOn a summer night in 2017, Chen Zhanqi made a curious find in his lab in China's Yunnan province. In an artificial nest, he spotted a juvenile jumping spider ...
Voyager 2 spacecraft enters interstellar space  Science NewsVoyager 2 has entered interstellar space. The spacecraft slipped out of the huge bubble of particles that encircles the solar system on November 5, becoming ...
Trump's nominee for USDA science post calls new U.S. climate report 'genuine'  Science MagazineThe entomologist nominated to be the chief scientist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in Washington, D.C., said today he accepts the conclusions of ...
$125 million gift from Microsoft co-founder launches new institute to probe immune system  Science MagazineImmunology is the latest field that will benefit from a hefty sum donated by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. The newly launched Allen Institute for Immunology, ...
Google's DeepMind predicts 3D shapes of proteins  The GuardianAI program's understanding of proteins could usher in new era of medical progress.
Dietary fat: From foe to friend?  Science MagazineFor decades, dietary advice was based on the premise that high intakes of fat cause obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and possibly cancer. Recently, evidence ...
Spider silk is five times stronger than steel—now, scientists know why  Science MagazineThe next time you brush aside a spiderweb, you might want to meditate on its delicate strength—if human-size, it would be tough enough to snag a jetliner. Now ...
Scientists pave the way for saliva test for Alzheimer's disease  Science DailyScientists have identified three biomarkers for detecting mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease in saliva samples. The research has promising ...
Universal flu vaccine remains 'an alchemist's dream'  Science MagazineNASHVILLE—What if instead of lining up for a flu shot of unknown effectiveness each fall, people could receive one vaccine that protects against all strains and ...
Why are these Costa Rican monkeys turning yellow?  Science MagazineMantled howler monkeys are beginning to sport yellow patches of fur.
Strongest evidence of early humans butchering animals discovered in North Africa  Science MagazineDiscovery suggests some of the world's first stone tools spread across Africa much earlier than expected.
Science Is Getting Less Bang for Its Buck  The AtlanticDespite vast increases in the time and money spent on research, progress is barely keeping pace with the past. What went wrong?
Martin Rees on the Future of Science and Humanity  Quanta MagazineFor 50 years, the astrophysicist Martin Rees has contributed to our understanding of cosmology. Now he is speaking up about the promise and potential dangers ...
Swifter, higher, stronger: What's on the menu?  Science MagazineThe exploits of elite athletes delight, frustrate, and confound us as they strive to reach their physiological, psychological, and biomechanical limits. We dissect ...
'Influenza' and 'Pandemic 1918' chronicle the flu's devastation  Science NewsOne-hundred years after the Spanish flu, 'Pandemic 1918' and 'Influenza' provide a new look at the global outbreak.
50 years ago, armadillos hinted that DNA wasn't destiny  Science NewsNine-banded armadillos have identical quadruplets. But the youngsters aren't identical enough, and scientists 50 years ago could not figure out why.
Hybrid rice engineered with CRISPR can clone its seeds  Science NewsAfter more than 20 years of theorizing about it, scientists have tweaked a hybrid variety of rice so that some of the plants produce cloned seeds. No plant sex ...
Humans may be reversing the climate clock, by 50 million years  Science DailyOur future on Earth may also be our past. Researchers show that humans are reversing a long-term cooling trend tracing back at least 50 million years. And it's ...
Scientists cataloged nearly 200 coral species living in the deep ocean  Science NewsNearly 200 species of Great Barrier Reef corals have found a second home in the deep ocean. That's six times as many species as previously thought to be ...
Scientists develop 10-minute universal cancer test  The GuardianInexpensive procedure shows whether patient has cancerous cells in the body, but does not reveal where or how serious it is.
We Have Ways To Stop Rogue Scientists. They Don’t Always Work.  FiveThirtyEightHow do you stop a mad scientist? We've been doing it in fiction for centuries. Doctor Faustus was carried off to hell. Pneumonia and an Arctic ice flow ended Vi…
Does science have a bullying problem?  Nature.comA spate of bullying allegations have rocked several high-profile science institutions. Here's how researchers, universities, funders and others are dealing with the ...
Cultural flies: Conformist social learning in fruitflies predicts long-lasting mate-choice traditions  Science MagazineThough once believed to be confined to humans, culture has now been demonstrated in many different animal species, from whales to parrots. Most such ...
Cosmic cacophony of colliding black holes continues  Science MagazineInfinitesimal ripples in space called gravitational waves have revealed four more instances in which two massive black holes have spiraled into each other and ...
Humpback whale songs undergo a 'cultural revolution' every few years  Science MagazineLike any fad, the songs of humpback whales don't stick around for long. Every few years, males swap their chorus of squeaks and groans for a brand new one.
First ever plane with no moving parts takes flight  The GuardianThe first ever “solid state” plane, with no moving parts in its propulsion system, has successfully flown for a distance of 60 metres, proving that heavier-than-air ...
MIT Scientists Just Used a Biological Virus to Make Faster Computers  ScienceAlertWhen your computer stores data, it has to pause while the information moves from one piece of hardware to another.
Did a new form of plague destroy Europe's Stone Age societies?  Science MagazineNearly 5000 years ago, a 20-year-old woman was buried in a tomb in Sweden, one of Europe's early farmers dead in her prime. Now, researchers have ...
Impact crater 19 miles wide found beneath Greenland glacier  The GuardianCrater appears to be result of mile-wide iron meteorite just 12000 years ago.
Antarctic Scientists Are About to Drill Into One of the Most Isolated Lakes on Earth  GizmodoBuried beneath 4000 feet of Antarctic ice lies Lake Mercer, a subglacial body of water that formed thousands of years ago and has been long separated from the ...
Dracula ants possess fastest known animal appendage: The snap-jaw  EurekAlertMove over, trap-jaw ants and mantis shrimp: There's a faster appendage in town. According to a new study, the Dracula ant, Mystrium camillae, can snap its ...
Climate change: Arctic reindeer numbers crash by half  BBC NewsThe population of wild reindeer, or caribou, in the Arctic has crashed by more than half in the last two decades. A new report on the impact of climate change in ...
Uniaxial pressure control of competing orders in a high-temperature superconductor  Science MagazineCuprate superconductors are known to harbor charge order in part of their phase diagram. Curiously, the order has a two-dimensional (2D) character at zero ...
Carbon dioxide emissions will hit a record high globally in 2018  Science News for StudentsGlobal carbon-dioxide emissions are expected to hit a record high in 2018. This is despite urgent calls for countries to cut back. Those calls have come from ...
Scientists scour WWI shipwreck to solve military mystery  Big Country HomepageWASHINGTON (AP) - A hundred years ago, a mysterious explosion hit the only major U.S. warship to sink during World War I. Now the Navy believes it has the ...
Taiwanese scientists fight construction of a new port they say would damage a unique reef  Science MagazineTAIPEI—Taiwanese scientists and environmental groups are fighting to stop the planned construction of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) receiving terminal off the ...
How This Supercolony of 1.5 Million Penguins Stayed Hidden for Nearly 3,000 Years  Live ScienceThis year, scientists announced an incredible discovery by looking at poop stains in satellite images — 1.5 million Adélie penguins were living and thriving on a ...
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Electrical Industrys Protection - Destruction for Good

Destruction! Blow Up! Eliminate! These are not pleasant words!Unfortunately, when... Read More

Megaliths and Pole Flips

The changes in the earth magnetic field away from the... Read More

New Energy Bill: Reducing Our Dependence on Foreign Oil

The U. S. economy is feeling the brunt of skyrocketing... Read More

Trojan World War

TROJAN WORLD WAR: - Homer said there were nineteen battles... Read More

Fire Escape System Concept

What if in the event of a fire the building... Read More

Social Robotic Bees to Prevent Killer Bee Attacks on Cities

We need to design tiny robotic bees, which can mimic... Read More

Earthquakes, Tsunamis, Mudslides: Extreme Events - What Do They Mean?

In lieu of recent, tumultuous occurrences, people are more compelled... Read More

How to Build a Mechanical Bullet Which Turns

A Mechanical bullet, which will turn in flight is well... Read More

That Dust on Your Car May Soon Be Smarter Than You Think?

Here is a thought to get this topic started. A... Read More

Mini-Robots, Motherships, Swarm Strategies, Wasps, Ants, Organization and Delivery

Robots are for every one. Tech TV now host Battle... Read More

Rodent Populations are Half within 3 miles of a Railroad Track

About a month ago, I was helping a friend collect... Read More

Surround Panoramic Night Vision is Possible

Modern night vision equipment is state of the art for... Read More

How Did DNA Testing Children Begin?

The landmark immigration case Sarbah vs. Home Office (1985) was... Read More

Paternity Testing Regulation: Help or Hindrance?

IntroductionThe internet has opened up opportunities for many DNA laboratories... Read More

What is Dowsing?

Dowsing is definitely an intuitive art and one of the... Read More

Environmental Eco-Terrorists Must Be Stopped

Eco-terrorists assume some how they are helping the environment, by... Read More

Hydro-Mini Tsunami-Perpetual Wave Making Machine

Let's describe this idea as a Self Generating a Tsunami-Perpetual... Read More

Memory Research Misses the Obvious

The search to reveal a mystery.Research laboratories around the world... Read More

Mars Surface Exploration and AFF

As we study more and more about Mars we know... Read More

Shooting Down a UAV in Flight

Shooting Down an Enemy UAV so it cannot give away... Read More

X-37 UAV Has Potential

X-37 Moves Forward, Now What? Well, here are a few... Read More

Natural Gas Cost Increases; Want to know more?

A Thorn in the Side for American Business and Consumers... Read More

Magnetic Propulsion for GI Joe?

Thought of the day. I talked to an old guy... Read More

Heads Up Displays and Computer Human Interface

Heads Up Displays For High Tech Human Interface Need More... Read More

Aliens

I am being allowed time out to raise a subject... Read More